Bartosz Skwarczek Creating a Vibrant Gaming Community | Episode 323

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An entrepreneur with over 20 years of experience, coach, mentor, and public speaker. The founder and President of the Supervisory Board G2A Capital Group, to which belongs G2A.COM – the largest and most dynamically developing global marketplace for digital entertainment, where users can buy vouchers for digital products such as games, gift cards, subscriptions, or software. The marketplace already has over 25 million users from 180 countries around the world.

 A winner of the Forbes magazine’s BrandMe CEO award, the Digital Shaper Award and the Gold Medal of the Polish Academy of Success. He’s also a co-founder and member of business organizations such as the International Leaders Forum, Google Next Gen CEO Club and Facebook Client Advisory Board and the Polish Council of Global Businessmen.

 Graduate of the AGH University (University of Science) of Krakow and the SGH Warsaw School of Economics, as well as Executive Education programs at Harvard (Finance), MIT (IT, Blockchain, Platformization, Productivity), and Oxford (Fintech).

 

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Full episode transcription (AI Generated)

Rob:
Hey, engagers, welcome back to another episode of the professor game podcast, and we have Bartosz with us, and I’m trying to do my best to make sure I do some polish pronunciation there, but Bartosz, are you prepared to engage? Thank you.

Bartosz:
Thank you. That is truly the best pronunciation that I heard. Thanks a lot. Great.

Rob:
Thank you very much, Bartos. So, Bartosz, we have you with us today because he’s an entrepreneur with over 20 years of experience. He’s been a coach, a mentor, and a public speaker. He is the founder and president of the supervisory board of G2A capital group, which belongs to G2A, the largest and most dynamically developing global marketplace for digital entertainment, where users can buy vouchers for digital products such as games, gift cards, subscriptions, or software. They already have over 25 million users from 180 countries around the world.

Rob:
Or Bartosz. Is there anything that I’m missing from that intro that you want to make sure we highlight?

Bartosz:
Oh, thank you. It was very kind of you. No, maybe that I love cats and.

Rob:
Dogs by equal nature. So if I ask you if you’re a cat person or a dog person, you can’t answer that question, right?

Bartosz:
I would say a dog person.

Rob:
Okay.

Bartosz:
And I love both.

Rob:
I have to say, I’ve had both cats and dogs in completely different settings. Cats in an apartment. And my dad used to have dogs in sort of a terrain he had very far away from where we lived, and we visited every now and then. So I can kind of say that I’ve had both cats and dogs, and I love them as well. I don’t know if I’m a cat person or a dog person, if I may say that.

Bartosz:
I think I have very unique experience, because on different parts of my life, I had even several dogs and cats at the same time in different houses, et cetera. And I can say that living like cat with dog saying is not true. It’s all about how you treat them. And always, they were great friends in my setup, so I really believe that cats and dogs can be really great friends.

Rob:
That reminds me, like, one of the cats my mom had was a cat that originally belonged to somebody else, but he was very, very small when he arrived to this place. My mom used to do real estate, and she was selling this very large estate in which they were sort of in the middle of the sale, and then in the middle of the sale, just broke up. But these guys had already brought in a cat and a dog, and they had refurbished part of the house. So forget about all the legal and the money business out there. The cat and the dog were left houseless all of a sudden, but they were living together.

Rob:
Right. So this very small cat really thought that he was a dog. He was convinced that he was a dog. Everything he did was doglike. He behaved completely like a dog.

Rob:
So he was kind of having a dog in the body of a cat because he was raised and the dog sort of carried him around and so on. So he was literally a dog. He went after the ball like a dog. He came to people very kindly instead of. Cats tend to be a little bit more cautious and so on.

Rob:
This cat was like, upfront. The opposite. He was pretty much a dog.

Bartosz:
Amazing story. Amazing story.

Rob:
Yeah. And they can definitely get along. I have to vouch for your saying absolutely. So, Bartosz, what are you doing on a daily basis? What do your days or weeks look like?

Rob:
We want to be under your shoes for a little bit. We want to sort of feel what you’re feeling these days.

Bartosz:
Okay. It, of course, depends on whether I am traveling or not. Traveling affects the rhythm of the day because you are in a constant rush, and most often you must deal with the jet lag. Last ten years of my life, I’ve been living between Amsterdam mostly, but also Boston, Spain, Poland, Germany, et cetera, and especially before COVID doing more or less 200 flights per year from Hong Kong to New York to Brazil to Shanghai, et cetera. So that was hectic.

Bartosz:
But normally, if I am not traveling, I start the day with bare walking on the grass. I take my dog and I just go out to have this little time very directly with the nature. Then I do meditation, then my first physical exercise, most often mobilization, functional training, stretching. Often during that, I’m listening podcasts, then cold water. I have a special place for that and all of that on empty stomach.

Bartosz:
However, I’m testing different approaches and diets, et cetera. And morning is also the first reading. After that, there is breakfast with the close ones while traveling, breakfast with business partners, friends. There’s a great book, never eat alone. And for me, eating is very special time.

Bartosz:
So I most often eat with someone, and most often or always, I’m trying to eat with someone who is very special to me. Then the video conferences and meetings that begins and lasts for more or less depends on the day, six to 12 hours, but I can do it all day long. So I had days of 16 hours of teleconferences, and in the meantime, two times per week and two times on a weekend, I have additional training. It’s my time for sport and changing my mindset. I would say this is a very special time because that gives you energy for the next meetings.

Bartosz:
And then is the evening and private time. And of course evening is the second reading and sleep at the end of the day is extremely important. I even have it scheduled on my calendar. And on the top of that, of course, sometimes I do conferences, meetings with other founders, chairman, ceos, investors, media and of course friends, family. So that would be my shoes to walk in.

Rob:
Interesting stuff. Plenty of things seem to be going on in your days, Bartos. So Bartos, let’s actually dive into one of the questions. And I think this is kind of a favorite for our guests and fans alike. With failure, right?

Rob:
I knew it. Your favorite fail or first attempt at learning, right. In relation of course with the gaming industry, whatever is related. Again, as you know, we talk about gamification, game based solutions, game inspired solutions, whatever you want to call it. And definitely the gaming industry as well.

Rob:
So whatever. Within that realm, what has been something interesting, again, we want to walk in your shoes when we’re in that story, because if you don’t want to name any specifics, that’s fine. But we want to especially see what lessons you took from that. And again, walk in your shoes.

Bartosz:
Once again, I think there is nothing wrong with failing and with doing failures. In fact, over the last 20 years of my career, it’s been always ups and downs. Being an entrepreneur is constant failing and constant going up. So I can share next 4 hours my failures. But just to stick with the one that you asked, let’s go with the physical line of the marketplace of G2A marketplace.

Bartosz:
So somewhere around 2019, we had seemingly a great idea allowing gamers to find everything for the gaming room in one place. So before G2A marketplace was the platform for trading different kind of digital items. And after that we decided, hey, if you are a gamer, why not to buy there also keyboards, mouses, all the logistics, chairs, gaming chairs, of course, et cetera. And the predictions were quite positive, but the results were underwhelming. The actual sales were low.

Bartosz:
There were issues with the logistics, with couriers, with storage, et cetera, and handling all this on a global scale. You have to remember that G2A is almost 200 countries. Business was a logistical trouble, to say it lightly. And eventually we hired Bain company. This is top tier advising, strategy advising company.

Bartosz:
We did twelve weeks workshop on strategy with them and they told us, hey, G2A, you are probably one of the best in the world or the best in the digital but you have no rights to win in physical. You should close it. And they gave us several reasons to do this. Of course, that was after the interviews with our employees, with myself, et cetera. And eventually we said, okay, let’s do it.

Bartosz:
And ultimately we cut this line off. We focused on all digital offer, which we grew out from, and we decided to focus on fully and develop further the digital lines of the business. And our main focus moved to becoming the largest online marketplace for digital entertainment by developing the non gaming branches like gift cards, like subscriptions, software elearning, and more. And right now, non gaming categories comprise about 20% of the marketplace globally and around 14% in the US. We are planning to work on increase it even more.

Bartosz:
And the business last year grew almost 30% year over year. So eventually, I think it was very good decision to focus on digital. And that was built on this failure of combining another line of business to our previous model.

Rob:
So basically what you’re saying is you were trying to expand into something that it didn’t work, which is, again, it’s fine, it’s a failure. It was a lesson that you learned and what you decided is, you know what, let’s focus on our core, which is a digital side, and that’s fine. That’s not a problem, right?

Bartosz:
Yes. There is one important lesson I think especially important for those of us who are successful. When you are successful in doing something, you think that everything you can do successfully, and this is wrong. It’s very easy to defocused. It’s very easy to take too many things on the plate, on the table.

Bartosz:
And it’s very easy to think that you can do everything rather than be really focused on where you are the best. So my advice here would be, if you plan to very much enlarge your business, especially in new categories, be sure that you did a very well research, be sure that you validated whether you have the team to do it, the resources, and first and foremost, where is your benchmark competitors, what they do, how many assets they have, whether you have rights to win with them.

Rob:
Absolutely. And I love it for many different reasons. One of them is something I like to repeat. And this happens on my workshops, this happens in my classes, this happens with my clients. People always feel that they’re missing out.

Rob:
Yeah, but we should also be doing maybe, maybe. But let’s win, and let’s win big on whatever it is that you’re great at. And then we can think of other things. Actually, I also teach, besides from games, gamification, game inspired solutions. I also teach operations and supply chain management.

Rob:
And one of the lessons from Lego, a very famous company as well, is they were about to go broke three times in the past. I think it was around 20 years ago. And what they realized is that there were many things that were not core to their business. So they realized, again, they were growing. There’s a massive company.

Rob:
They were able to do many things, but they didn’t have to do all those many things. And they got out of financial trouble essentially by saying, we’re not doing this, we’re not doing this, we’re not doing this, and we’re not doing that. We are going to continue doing and focusing on our core business and those things that we’re best prepared for winning at. And the rest, we will just drop. We will sell, we will whatever.

Rob:
We will not be doing those other things. And I love it, again, for many reasons. But those are two of the things that came to my mind when we were listening to that story. Fully agree Bartosz that’s the first thing. And the next thing is, of course, we love to hear about failure and how to learn from that and what are the lessons.

Rob:
But we also like to listen to some of the things. You guys have actually had success, and you gave us some intro into some of that. But again, we want to be there with you. We want to learn some of the lessons, or maybe if you have some of the, I don’t know, success factors, if you want to call it, I don’t know. Again, we want to take some lessons from your experience.

Bartosz:
Definitely stronghold for us was always to be a gamer. And most of our employees were gamers. Most of G2A employees were gamers. And when we were switching the business model, and that was around 2014, there was a very important challenge that we faced. So before G2A was a marketplace.

Bartosz:
We were operating as a retailer, finding publishers, developers to distribute games for. And I was flying around the world trying to get the official agreement with them. And around 2014, as G2A, we were already a european leader in distribution. World of Warcraft, I guess you know, the game at that time that was number one. And I was knocking the door of every big publisher, EA, Activision Blizzard, Ubisoft, you name them.

Bartosz:
And I was saying, hey, we are really big seller. We would love to be your official distributor. And Rob, guess how many official meetings they gave me? I was traveling literally every conference in the world. Gamescom, e three, gstar, imagine the country.

Bartosz:
I was there, how many official meetings they gave me and say, hey, let’s.

Rob:
Talk well, anything between exactly zero and like 100, it was zero.

Bartosz:
It’s hard to believe, but the industry was so hermetic that we were frustrated. We were saying, like, come on, it’s not happening. How is that possible? And that was the catalyst of moving to a marketplace business. So we said, all right, so if they don’t want to work with us, the only way to scale the business, to grow farther is to create a marketplace.

Bartosz:
So anybody can buy, anybody can sell, unless you follow terms and condition the rules, the law, et cetera. And this is what we did, this is what we created. And very important was also a trend of digitalization. So the industry were moving from box distribution to digital distribution. And that was important moment for us.

Bartosz:
So G2A 2014 was the beginning of being a marketplace. And from that moment, we really skyrocketing. And right now as a marketplace, we really think globally. So we think globally and we try to act locally. So what I mean by that is that the solution we implemented is about local approach, not only payment methods, because at G2A, you can find 200 different payment methods.

Bartosz:
So we very early understood that if you are from the United States or UK, the life is easy. PayPal, credit card boom, done. But if you are from India, you need to have Paytm. If you are from Brazil, you have to have boletto and so on with any other country. So we created very quickly a hub of payments with 200 local payment methods.

Bartosz:
And this is also what we do now. So we are acting locally, hiring people locally and looking at the markets from the geographical local perspective. So that is the challenge that we face in the past. And I think very interesting solution that we found changing totally the business model from retailer to a marketplace. And lastly, when we think about challenges of the business and in general of the industry, it is of course cybersecurity fighting with the cybercrime and cybersecurity threats.

Bartosz:
Because cybercrime is on the rise. It cost about almost 10 trillion with the t trillion dollars in 2024. And it’s growing really fast. And when we compare G2A to other businesses and to average of the industry, I can give you one very interesting number, because every platform, whether this is a marketplace or an ecommerce platform, is looking for the fraud rate. And we managed to keep very low fraud rate of zero point 39% compared to industry average of 3.6%.

Bartosz:
So we are almost ten times better than the average industry. And many people is asking, hey, how is that possible? How you do it? I was even invited to Berlin to a leading european conference to give a speech on that, how we do it. And there is so many different things that we’ve been developing for years.

Bartosz:
And if I can be ambassador for something on the global scale, it would be definitely the cybersecurity, because cybercrime is harmful not only for the platforms, but also for the whole industry. So cybersecurity, on the other hand, is especially important for every e commerce business.

Rob:
Very, very important. And these challenges are growing day in, day out. So thank you very much for those recommendations as well. Bartosz. Bartosz.

Rob:
When you’re trying to find solutions, right, because I’m an engineer by trade, and that’s kind of a mentality they stick in you at the university and it never goes out. But I think, in general, most of us are, in one way or another, we’re problem solvers. That’s what we’re doing every single day, from people who are taking care of kids, right. They’re solving problems that arise every single day. To engineers as myself, to I think you, as well as a president of your organization, are definitely solving problems all the time.

Rob:
So how do you find solutions to problems when they are, especially in this video game, with their ideas, when they’re creating video games or games in general, how do you help them solve these problems? Do you have, I don’t know, a method, a series of steps? How do you do these things? How would you approach it?

Bartosz:
One of many factors that are important for us is our identity. And being in the gaming industry means that, like I said, many of our G2A employees are gamers, and G2A is a value based company. What I mean by that is that I believe we source many of the ideas how to solve the problems from games and the values that games can enhance. What I mean by that is teamwork. All of the type of multi team games or accountability or competitiveness or trust or feedback, all those values are very crucial, and we have them in our dna.

Bartosz:
At the same time, we source it from the gaming ground, we source it from who we are. And here at G2A, we want to make sure that the ideas and solutions that come from games are very naturally implemented. So I can give you one of the idea. You must gather your party before venturing forth. That’s a quote from Baldur’s Gate, very famous game.

Bartosz:
And basically, it means that having the correct team composition is the key to success. So picking the members of your team is very similar to picking the party members. You have to be sure you know their skills and trust them. With their skills and tasks that you are giving them. And this is especially important when you are a manager, because the manager has this very tempting behavior, like doing everything the best way.

Bartosz:
And you don’t want to do micromanagement, you want to delegate, and you want to give your people free will and free hand to do it. And that’s why extremely important is to know what are their skills and what tasks you can give them and be very calm that they will deliver. And the team members have to work very well together and complement themselves. So that would be our approach to problems and solutions. We approach them through human lens.

Bartosz:
We approach them rather through values and people working together rather than through many tech solutions that we use or rather than through procedures that we of course have in place. But in my opinion, at the beginning and at the end of every problem and the solution is a human being.

Rob:
That is amazing and it’s something entirely new from what we typically have. So thank you very much for that, for sure. And Bartosz, when we are talking about recommendations, you’ve given plenty of value here. You’ve heard some of the questions of the podcast already, the vibe that we have, what we’re into again, creating games, gamification, game inspired solutions, game thinking, all this world. Is there somebody that you would say, well, I would be particularly interested in hearing the perspectives from this or that person from this realm as well.

Rob:
Is there sort of a future guest that you would think? Oh, that would be interesting for me personally to listen to, for sure.

Bartosz:
Someone from one of G2A business partners like Microsoft, wargaming, Akamai leaders, great companies, and I’d love to hear what they say on your amazing podcast.

Rob:
Amazing. Well, we’ll stay in touch to see if we can get in touch with any of the ones that you could suggest in the future for sure. Bartosz and keeping up with those recommendations, is there a book that you would, you know, read this book and at least you’ll get some interesting ideas for maybe game design or maybe something in the creative industry or gaming. I don’t know. Again, a book recommendation that you could give us.

Bartosz:
Two books. One is the very latest. Mustafa Suleiman, the coming wave. So after reading this book, your life will not be the same when you think about the future. The AI, the biotech, et cetera, amazing book.

Bartosz:
And all time number one on my shelf, the book, which I read for the first time 20 years ago, and after that I read it seven times, is awaken the giant within by Tony Robbins.

Rob:
Awaken the giant within. I’ve read a lot about Tony Robbins, but I have no idea which are his book or books. So that is definitely one book to keep on the lookout for. Thank you for those recommendations. And in this realm of video games, in the video game industry, which is your day to day, what would you say is your superpower?

Rob:
That thing that you would do at least better than most other people?

Bartosz:
I think my superpower is people finding the proper team, moderate, finding the common ground, oil, the human machinery, motivating, sharing the values, sharing the vision. That is from my personal perspective and from G2A perspective, I think our superpower is think outside the box. Sometimes the currently offered solutions are not the best one, possibly for your users, and you are always thinking of something new. And on our roadmap you can see 150 features that are under development coming on our marketplace within the next year. And also, I think our superpower is predicting trends.

Bartosz:
So it was moving away from box distribution to digital. It was supporting esport and influencers. G2A was one of the first of the industry doing that on a massive scale or connecting physical and virtual entertainment like Driftmasters. Serious something. We engaged this year and this is amazing partnership for the next couple of years.

Rob:
Yeah, amazing. Good stuff. And I’m going to bring you now what I think is one of the most difficult questions we have according to the. Ok, so, Bartosz, what would you say is your favorite game?

Bartosz:
I love this question. My favorite game all time is Mortal Kombat. I played the first, and I played every next and every next edition that was there. And that is amazing when you can look, something was over 20 years ago and something is now. And you can compare how far the industry went through that time.

Bartosz:
So Mortal Kombat series is my all time favorite.

Rob:
The series. The series. I think the first one I played was Mortal Kombat two from memory, out of memory, to be honest, because I remember playing it on a pc.

Bartosz:
Yes.

Rob:
With a bunch of floppy disks.

Bartosz:
Yes.

Rob:
I know I’m losing a part of the audience just by mentioning the word floppy disks, because you have no idea what that is. You know the save button that you see most of the times it looks like a weird thing. Well, that used to be a floppy disk. That’s what they looked like. And they have the capacity of like, I don’t know, 1,000,000th of a blu ray or something like that, or less.

Bartosz:
It was floppy disk. And I even remember the time when we have this record tape and there was a game, MotoGP, about Motorbike et cetera and very different time to what we have right now. But what is important, in my opinion, is don’t be scared of what is coming, because there’s a great saying which I love, that world have never been changed so fast as now, but it’s not going to be changing. Never as slow as now.

Rob:
Yeah, that’s true. That’s true. Actually, that’s probably true. I have no idea what the future looks like.

Bartosz:
I think it’s going to be much faster.

Rob:
If we look at the past, we use trends and tendencies. It’s just going to get more accelerated.

Bartosz:
I don’t think there is anybody who can predict what is going to happen within the next five, seven years when we combine the new technologies that are coming as a one wave. So one moment in time when they are gathering the critical mass, and I mean by that saying about AI and about biotech, in the meaning of what we see with the companies that are creating the biosolutions and robotics. So these three industries, and on the top of that new, even not new version, but new idea of the computer and the power of computing is something that will change the world very much. And I don’t think anybody can predict what is going to happen within five, seven years.

Rob:
Yeah, it’s really tough. One of the things is I always sort of revert to, and you mentioned some of this to the human nature, right to the way we are and we interact and so on. And the interesting thing is, if you think about it, our bodies, our minds, et cetera, have not really evolved in any significant way since we were living in caverns. So this acceleration, I completely agree that there is a lot of potential and it could grow very fast. But I’m just curious.

Rob:
I’m not saying we should stop it. I’m not saying it’s a bad or a good thing. I’m just curious about how it’s already getting to be very tough to keep up, at least for most people. With all the things that are happening, is there going to be a time when we literally are not able to keep up? And what is going to happen?

Rob:
Right. So things are going way too fast. Is it going to be that people are so specialized that everything else around them is almost like gibberish for everybody else? So you’ll almost only be able to talk about work with people that work in exactly the same thing as you? I don’t know, it’s just thinking about that kind of future is always interesting.

Rob:
I had a little bit of a discussion about this when we were talking about supply chain 4.0 and all the things that are happening. Some of the students were like, yeah, well, but I’m studying business today. In five years, whatever it is I’m doing is maybe not going to be a job anymore, right? This is going to be done by AI. Well, maybe.

Rob:
I don’t know. There are arguments where you can say these things, and these things are, at least as of today, way too human to be AI’d, so to speak. But again, we don’t know. We don’t know what we don’t know. So it’s a tough one.

Rob:
Particularly interesting for me is, again, how will we be sort of coping with these things is sort of a topic that I could be very curious about. At least.

Bartosz:
I have two comments on that. One is encouraging because when we look at the last revolution in the job market, and when you compare the rob market between the second world war, so 1940, comparing to today, then almost 50% of the jobs we have didn’t existed, didn’t exist at all. So this is something very new that were created and I think it is going to happen again. So I am not worrying at all about the job market because the job market is very dynamic and some jobs are going to disappear, many jobs are going to be created. And the other thing about this getting up with the speed of the world, I think now we are in one of the most difficult times because we have tons of data and we don’t have too many personal assistance to process that.

Bartosz:
Within the next two years, two, three years, we will have amazing support from the AI perspective. I mean, everyone in the world will have personal assistant to analyze data and it will be very powerful and it will be giving you tons of conclusions. And I think it will be a little bit easier with the analyzing data, with the analyzing the Internet, with the analyzing all the sources we have. And there will be, of course, many new challenges because we have right now so many engines when it comes to AI and the cybersecurity part of AI and the cybercrime, which AI is going to speed up and make it more sophisticated, that will be a big challenge. So there will be another war, and another war will be between the bright side, which is AI helping us with cybersecurity, and the dark side, which is AI threatening us and helping the bad guys, the bad actors with cybercrimes.

Bartosz:
And the next couple of years is going to be very tough from that perspective. So that’s why we should be really focused on regulators to give them a sign that they have to regulate this fear and finally, thanks. Something is happening there and we have to be very focused with our businesses to be up to date when it comes to cybersecurity.

Rob:
Big challenges up ahead for sure. Big, big stuff. So, Bartosz, thank you. And let me get a stab at your last name live on the podcast, right? So, Bartosz Skwarczek, thank you.

Bartosz:
Thank you. That was very good. That was very good.

Rob:
Rob, thank you very much. I love to kind of play this game of trying to pronounce my guests names and last names as best as I can. And I’ve got an interesting ones, ones that I have no idea how to pronounce and so on. But experience always doesn’t make you perfect, but it makes you a lot better than you were before it, for sure.

Bartosz:
You said it very well. And the way you pronounce Bartosz is like original version.

Rob:
Thanks a lot. Fantastic. I hope they are proud of me in motherland, Poland.

Bartosz:
Thank you very much.

Rob:
Thank you, Bartosz, again, thank you very much for dedicating this time. I know you have a very busy schedule. There’s a lot of stuff going on on G2A, many exciting things going on. However, Bartosz, however, engagers, as you know, at least for now and for today, it is time to actually, before we do that, we need to know where we can find out more about you. Bartosz and G2A, any call to action or, I don’t know, whatever you want to go for before we do that.

Bartosz:
Of course, LinkedIn is a good place. Either you say you type Bartosz, Skwarczek, or Skwarczek or G2A, and of course, all other social media, Twitter, Facebook, my website, Skwarczek.eu feel very much invited to everyone and you can easily write to me on LinkedIn. I am reading all the messages, so hopefully see you.

Rob:
Hopefully we might have a chance to meet. We’re not super close. We’re in Europe, it’s a common area. We are traveling a bit, both of us, so there might be a chance for us to meet in person. Engagers, I know you are all around the, you know, anytime you want to reach out to Bartosz, see where he’s hanging out, maybe you will get a chance to meet.

Rob:
That would be absolutely amazing. If you do, please let me.

Bartosz:
Know.

Rob:
Very lovely, lovely to have this chat again. Thank you very much for your time, for your insights, your experience. However, at least for now and for today, it is time to say that it’s game over. Hey engagers. And thank you for listening to the professor game podcast.

Rob:
And I hope you enjoyed this interview with Bartosz. Is there any question that you have running through your mind that we don’t answer currently on the professor game podcast. If you do, please go to professorgame.com slash question and ask your question. Once it is selected, it’ll come up in a future episode and you’ll get your answer live in an episode with one of those guests. Right.

Rob:
And before you go on to your next mission, remember to subscribe or follow whatever that looks like on your favorite podcast app, which, by the way, is totally for free. And listen to the next episode of Professor Game. See you there.

End of transcription

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